Constitution Translated for Kids, by Cathy Travis

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Translate the Constitution for Kids this 4th of July;

More Americans Can Name All Five “Simpson’s” Than All Five First Amendment Rights

WASHINGTON, D.C. – School may soon be ending, but the learning shouldn’t stop when classroom doors close. This 4th of July, it’s time to break out the history books and make politics fun again for kids. Afterall, a recent survey found that your kids probably know more about “The Simpson’s” cartoon family than about the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

According to the McCormick Tribune Freedom Museum of Chicago, more than one in five Americans can name all the members of the cartoon family, yet only one in 1,000 could list the five basic freedoms granted by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: freedom of speech, religion, press, assembly and petition. The study also showed that people often misidentified First Amendment rights. For example, about one in five people thought the right to own a pet was protected. While seventeen percent of Americans think the First Amendment guarantees them the right to drive a car

So why are so few informed about our nation’s government? According to Cathy Travis, communications director for Congressman Solomon P. Ortiz (D-Texas) and Constitution aficionado, the problem lies in the convoluted language of this fundamental document. In her new book, “Constitution Translated for Kids” (Synergy Books, April 2006), Travis untangles the Constitution’s complicated wording in a way that is accessible to both the young and old. The original text is paired side-by-side with a kid-friendly interpretation to pique interest and stimulate further discussion.

In an interview, Travis can discuss:

· Why kids should care about the Constitution and the rights it guarantees

· How parents can use Independence Day to pique kids’ interest in the Constitution

· Fun 4th of July activities to celebrate our freedoms as Americans

· What schools need to do to improve government education for kids

Cathy Travis resides in Washington, DC and has worked on Capitol Hill for more than twenty years. Though she has spent the majority of that time working for various members of the Democratic Party, she herself is a registered Independent. Travis holds a bachelor’s degree in public relations with an emphasis in political science from Arkansas State University. To learn more, visit: www.constitutiontranslatedforkids.com.

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